Tag Archives: George Will

Paul Dickson’s Top Baseball Book Selections are Profound

Paul Dickson, who is quickly becoming one of the premier sports biographers in the PaulDicksonPicturebusiness, selected his top five baseball books in an article today in the Wall Street Journal (April 22-23, 2017, p. c10).  The article is entitled “Five Best:  A Personal Choice.”

Dickson, who most recently penned a biography on Leo Durocher, also wrote a classic biography on Bill Veeck.  I read and posted blogs on both of these books, and you can read them here.

Veeck:  (3/14/2014)http://www.15minutebusinessbooks.com/blog/2014/03/14/paul-dicksons-masterpiece-about-bill-veeck/

Durocher: (3/19/2017) http://www.15minutebusinessbooks.com/blog/2017/03/19/dicksons-newest-characterizes-leo-the-lip/

These are Dickson’s top five selections in the WSJ article:

  1. Ball Four by Jim Bouton (1970)
  2. Only the Ball Was White by Robert Peterson (1970)
  3. Veeck as in Wreck by Bill Veeck (1962)
  4. The Science of Hitting by Ted Williams (1970)
  5. Moneyball by Michael Lewis (2003)

I have no problems with any of these selections.  However, if I were making a list, I would have at the very top, the amazing work by George F. Will, entitled Men at Work:  The Craft of Baseball (Macmillan, 1990).  That book has convinced many skeptics and critics who think that professional athletes just play that they actually work.  No, this book proves they work.  And, they work harder and longer at their craft than the vast majority of employees in most professions, including examining multitudes of complex variables in making decisions.  Baseball players, in this book, are not the “boys of summer.”  They are truly men at work.  To me, for baseball fans who read books, it is an essential selection.

Cowlishaw’s List of Sports Books is Intriguing

I enjoy listening to Tim Cowlishaw in Dallas every afternoon on 103.FM.  He is a prominent columnist and reporter for SportsDay in the Dallas Morning News.TimCowlishawPicture

Today, I saw that he published his list of the top 50 sports books, in an article entitled “By My Reading…” (March 15, 2015, p. 14C)  Click the link here and you will see an interactive page that explains why he believes that a book belongs on the list, and what it contributes.

Cowlishaw is a veteran sports reporter in the DFW area.  He also appears on the ESPN national television program “Around the Horn.”  He joined the Dallas Morning News in 1989.  He has been a beat writer for the Dallas Cowboys, Texas Rangers, and Dallas Stars.  Today, he focuses his work on daily columns.

Drunk on Sports CoverIn 2014, he published his own book, Drunk on Sports (Vigliano Publishing), in which he detailed his struggles and victory over alcoholism.

 

It was fun to look at Cowlishaw’s list of books.  If I were making such a list, I would include Men at Work by George Will (Easton Press, 1990).  That book explained the game day business of baseball better than anything I have ever seen.  It convinced me, as well as others, that baseball is not “boys at play.”

 

 

I was amazed how many of the books I had read, and even saved.  My favorites off his list were:

  • Ball Four by Jim Bouton (Dell, 1971)
  • Boys of Summer by Roger Kahn (Harper and Row, 1972)
  • Friday Night Lights by Buzz Bissinger (De Capo Press, 2000)
  • Eight Men Out by Eliot Asinof (Holt, 2000)
  • Moneyball by Michael Lewis (W.W. Norton, 2004)
  • Cosell by Howard Cosell (Playboy Press, 1973)
  • Instant Replay by Jerry Kramer (World Press, 1968)

Cowlishaw did a good job of selecting and explaining why these books were prominent in a very concise way.

After reading it, I wanted to go out to the garage and see if I can pull out some of these.  Some would be yellowed, tattered, and torn.

Of course, I would have to find them first.

We rarely get any comments on our blog posts.  But, I am interested to see if you would add or subtract any sports books from his list after you look it over.

 

 

Time Ran Out on the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” – But the Books Live On

I am saddened today when I read about the passing of Bobby Thomson.  His “shot heard ’round the world” put the New York baseball Giants into the 1951 World Series.  This was a dramatic home run that gave the Giants the National League pennant.

Here is the link to the article on Sports Illustrated.com that details his accomplishments, his life, and the famous game.

You can also watch the original video with one of the most excited play-by-play voices you will ever hear.

As you might suspect, many authors have included stories about this home run.  Here are just a few:

Miracle Ball: My Hunt for the Shot Heard ‘Round the World by Brian Biegel,

The Echoing Green: The Untold Story of Bobby Thomson, Ralph Branca and the Shot Heard Round the World (Vintage) by Joshua Prager

Rob Neyer’s Big Book of Baseball Blunders: A Complete Guide to the Worst Decisions and Stupidest Moments in Baseball History by Rob Neyer

The 30 Greatest Sports Conspiracy Theories of All-Time: Ranking Sports’ Most Notorious Fixes, Cover-ups, and Scandals by Elliott Kalb, et al.

Bunts by George F. Will

The Opposite Field: A Memoir by Jesse Katz

I am always interested in how single events like this find their way into countless numbers of books.  And for everyone who was not alive in 1951, it is an important link to history.  I am certain we have not seen the last book on this subject.

Is all the business world a field or court?

A quick stroll through the business section of a bookstore or a search through the management section of an on-line retailer will quickly reveal the plethora of  titles available from sports figures.  Working from the analogy that the activities inherent around a basketball court, a football field, or a baseball diamond simulate the activities in the workplace, many current and former athletes and coaches have penned treatises teaching us how to be successful on the job.   Topics for these books include leadership, management, motivation, teamwork, self-improvement, finance, and others.

A great recent example of this is the book by John Wooden that we featured at the First Friday Book Synopsis and that you can purchase at 15MinuteBusinessBooks.com.   This book is also accompanied by videos, manuals, and training courses.  No one can question Wooden’s success as a repetitive NCAA champion head basketball coach at UCLA.   You could say the same thing about practically any of these authors.  After all, who would read a book from a loser?  I learned a long time ago in attending conventions of the National Speakers Association, that if you want to be successful in the business, follow the path of a successful speaker, not a failure. 

Here are some others:

Rick Pitino – head basketball coach at the University of Louisville:  Success Is a Choice: Ten Steps to Overachieving in Business and Life 

Fran Tarkenton – former NFL quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings and New York Giants:  What Losing Taught Me About Winning: The Ultimate Guide for Success in Small and Home-Based Business

Mike Ditka – former NFL head coach for the Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints:  In Life, First You Kick Ass: Reflections on the 1985 Bears and Wisdom from Da Coach

The assumption behind all of these books is that the activities and best practices which yielded success for these authors in sports are relevant and applicable to what we do at work.  Therefore, a manager can use the techniques that a head coach uses, employees are players, competitors are opponents, strategies are plays, pilots or rollouts are practices, groups should become teams, and so forth.  We can use terms and phrases such as, “she struck out today,” “this looks like a home run,” “he’s our quarterback,” and “we’re in a sand trap.”  You get the point.

I think that there is some legitimacy to this, although I can tell you that in teaching my MBA courses at the University of Dallas, students are tiring of the sports analogy in business, particularly for teamwork.  You may remember the series of silly commercials from American Express a few years ago entitled “Great Moments in Business,” where employees piled up on each other in a room after a successful presentation, and high-fived each other as if they had just won a World Series after a closed sale.

If you believe that the principles that motivate human beings are the same, no matter what the context, then you would have no problem with what these books try to do.   Who would not advocate “practice” before performance, whether that is a presentation, a draft of a document or e-mail, or a pilot program prior to a national product introduction?   The same principles and behaviors that qualify a group of people as a team on the court or field should apply on the job.  Consider trust, which is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for teamwork.  Without trust, there is no team, no matter where it is.   We don’t have to talk about money –  that’s an issue in the business of sports as much as the business of business.  Some have a lot, and some don’t have enough.  Some even go out of existence, such as the recent announcement that the 20-year Arena Football League will cease operations.  Some look for outside buoyance.  The Federal Government keeps General Motors alive.  Major League Baseball did the same for the Montreal Expos before moving them to Washington, D.C.   Every sports franchise is as much of a business as a firm on Wall Street, or anywhere else.

And, managers and employees can go through all the motions of strategic planning, just like coaches and players study a playbook, diagram motions, and run through plays on the practice field or court, only to learn that when they face a competitor, it is considerably different.   Rarely is there a situation where the presence of an opponent is the not the cause of substantial modifications in strategy, and the possibility of failure. 

Remember when George Will told us that baseball players are not the “boys of summer,” but rather, “Men at Work.”  He argued that baseball managers, just as business managers, examine a set of complex variables in making decisions.  And, that players perfect their skills on the diamond in ways that go well beyond how employees do the same in the workplace.

In conclusion, advice from sports personalities about business is probably no worse than the lessons we can read about based upon Abraham Lincoln, Jesus Christ, Machiavelli, or General Robert E. Lee.   Like many of these sports personalities, they didn’t run or work for any of today’s companies, but authors have used their best practices to show us how to work better in our jobs. 

Is all the business world a field or a court?  Perhaps no worse than a stage.  No matter how we do it, we all have to perform.  The question is simply what resources we want to use to guide us to success. 

Let’s talk about it.  What do you think?